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How to Become a Broker

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Becoming a broker is quite difficult. First of all, brokers undergo a high degree of stress. Training to become a broker is particularly difficult because trainees must study for the General Securities Registered Representative Examination while working full time for a firm. In addition, trainees are not paid very much.

Earn a college degree in accounting, finance or business. A degree in another subject may help you receive an internship. An applicant with no experience and a degree in another subject such as marine biology is preferred over an applicant with no experience and no college education. Although a college degree is not required to become a broker, it is highly recommended. Many of the top training programs hire only applicants with college degrees.

Inquire about internships at any local brokerage firms to your college counselor. Previous knowledge and experience are a huge advantage in getting into a training program to become a broker.

Apply at every brokerage firm within your area. In your resume, detail your previous experience and your college education. In addition, include any investing history.

After four months of training, take the General Securities Registered Representative Examination. In addition, ask your brokerage firm whether you need to take the Uniform Securities Agents State Law Examination. Some states require brokers to take it, while others don't. Brokerage firms themselves register trainees for the exams.

About the Author

Liam Walter is a self-employed stock operator. In addition to being a financial speculator, he is a lead writer for new-electronics.com, and has been freelance writing since early 2001. Walter studied kinesiology at Austin Community College. Before becoming a full-time trader, Walter worked as a certified nurse's assistant in various nursing facilities.

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