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How to Become a Home Inspector in Ohio

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Becoming a home inspector in Ohio does not require any special training. However, to be effective in the career, it is prudent to seek experience before accepting any client work. There are numerous resources available for educating people interested in becoming home inspectors in Ohio. For instance, you may refer to several associations to get started on the path to a new flexible job. Expect to invest in training and to complete an exam to become a quality home inspector in Ohio.

Research the field of being a home inspector in Ohio. Determine the daily expectations and the best way to be employed. For instance, most home inspectors are part of small businesses and work independently. Therefore, good management skills are required. To gain an overview, you may consider shadowing an active home inspector in your local area. To locate one, use the Yellow Pages or search the Internet to inquire about your interest.

Compare training options to become a qualified home inspector. Training will include learning about a home's foundation, plumbing, electrical, roofing, equipment, interior and exterior. Furthermore, you will learn about laws you must follow. In most cases, this will be followed up with an exam to certify your skills. To learn more details about what to expect in training to become a home inspector, refer to the Home Check reference link.

Choose a respected training source. This can be done online through an association or in a traditional classroom setting at a community college. Refer to the reference section for options regarding the suggested education.The cost will vary, but it can be completed for $1,000, according to the Home Check reference. Also, it serves as a free source for advertising service once you have officially become a home inspector.

Complete the preparation training for a home inspector successfully. Ohio does not require a generic business license, according to the Department of Development in 2010. However, it is always astute to check for any legislative changes before entering this career. Refer to the Ohio.gov website to confirm.

About the Author

Jamie M. Kisner currently works as a South Florida entrepreneur of JMK Notary & Services and a Miami-Dade College instructor. During her spare time, she writes online content for a variety of sites, including eHow, Digital Journal, Bukisa and Homeless Voice. She holds a master's degree in business administration from Florida's Nova Southeastern University.

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