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How to Transfer EMT Certification

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Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) are an important and valuable element of the 911 emergency response process in the United States. Working with police and firefighters, EMTs assess the condition of injured individuals at the the emergency site, stabilize patients and prepare them for quick and safe transport to a medical facility. When an EMT is in the process of moving to another state, they need to check state requirements to determine if they can continue to practice in the new location. Transferring certification can be simple, with many states offering a reciprocity program for national and state certified professionals.

Check state reciprocity requirements through the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT). Even if you do not have national certification through the NREMT, their website offers state by state information on EMT requirements. This should help you quickly locate the EMT requirements and a website link to the state agency that oversees the process.

Ensure your state issued certification is current. You will be required to show proof of current certification in your previous state to apply for certification in your new state. If you have let your state certification lapse, you should re-certify in your previous state or be prepared to complete the full certification process, including testing, in your new state.

Visit your destination state website to complete the transfer process and confirm any applicable test requirements to your current license status. In the state of Texas, for example, nationally certified EMTs should submit their proof of NREMT certification, along with proof of certification from their previous state. These applicants must complete an out-of-state reciprocity application and pay the application fee, but the National Registry assessment exam is waived in Texas with NREMT current certification.

Complete any state mandated testing or refresher course requirements. There are several circumstances in which a certified EMT will be required to test for certification in their new state. In New York state, for example, EMTs must participate in a refresher course to transfer their certification. In the state of Texas, individuals must take the NREMT Assessment exam. For details on the NREMT exam for EMTs, see the Resource section below.

2016 Salary Information for EMTs and Paramedics

Emts and paramedics earned a median annual salary of $32,670 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, emts and paramedics earned a 25th percentile salary of $25,850, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $42,710, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 248,000 people were employed in the U.S. as emts and paramedics.

About the Author

CL Hardy is a communication professional based in Austin, Texas. In addition to writing corporate newsletters, proposals and technical white papers for Fortune 500 clients for more than 12 years, Hardy has been published in "Black Collegian" magazine; her articles on human resources, business and art topics can be found on eHow. She graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a B.S. in communication.

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