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How to Save a Resume File Type

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There are more and more ways to apply for jobs these days, so it's important for an applicant to have his resume in different file formats. Typically, online applications require Text files. Hard copy or emailed resumes are best sent and printed as an RTF file. And posting a resume as a link is often best served as a PDF file. Understanding how to save your resume in each format will aid your job search.

Text Files (.txt)

Open your resume in your preferred word processor and select "Save As" from the File menu. Choose "Plain Text File," "ASCII," or "Text." All of these options will save the document in the .txt extension. If these options are not present, continue to Step 2.

Select all of the text in your resume and copy it by pressing "Ctrl" and "C."

Click the Start menu, navigate to "Programs," then "Accessories," then "Notepad." Press "Ctrl" and "V" to paste your resume text into the file. Proofread it carefully; any previous formatting will be lost. When you're finished, click "File," then "Save As." Name your resume, which is now saved in .txt format.

Rich Text Format (.rtf)

Open your resume in your word processor and click "File."

Click "Save As." Select "Rich Text Format."

Attach your resume to an email or upload the file to a website. The advantage to .rtf files is that they are not specific to a particular word processing program.

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Portable Document Format (.pdf)

Open your resume in your word processor and click "File."

Click "Save As" and see whether PDF is an option for your word processor. If it is not, continue to Step 3.

Visit PDF Converter. (There is a link in the Resources section.) Click "Browse" and navigate to your source file to upload it. Click "Convert Your File;" momentarily, your file will be converted to PDF. Click the link to download it. You can have the file emailed to you if you enter your email address.

Warning

You will not be able to edit your resume when it is saved as a PDF.

Resources

About the Author

Jake Damon has his Ph.D. in English from Texas Tech University. Damon has been a writer and editor since 1998. He edits two professional journals, has published books including "Catullan Consciousness" and "Re-Reading Thomas Traherne," and written articles for various academic and trade presses, including Oxford University Press, Associated University Presses and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Arizona State University.

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