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How to Become a RN Case Manager

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RN case managers coordinate the care of patients that have major illnesses or injuries. They monitor treatment, medications and evaluate the patient’s response to the treatment plan. These professionals work in a variety of settings including: long-term care homes, worker’s compensation companies, hospitals and private medical practices. But to qualify to become an RN case manager, you must earn your Bachelor’s degree in nursing, plus complete a case management certificate program. Here’s a guide to becoming an RN case manger.

Earn your Bachelor’s degree in nursing. This program typically takes 4 years to complete on a full-time track. To find nursing schools in your area, search All Nursing Schools (see Resources), which is a national directory of accredited programs.

Earn a nursing case management certificate. After you earn your nursing degree, enroll in a nurse case management program. This certificate can be earned online with programs such as Kaplan University School of Nursing and University of Phoenix, and takes 12 months to complete.

Update your resume. Once you have completed the required education, update your resume to include case management skills and education. For examples of resumes, check out Sample Resumes (see resources).

Apply for jobs. RN case manager jobs can be found at the American Nursing Association’s website. You can also check out job boards like Monster and HotJobs or your local hospital and medical practices' websites.

Tip

Learn if this career is right for you by shadowing a case manager for a few days. Contact your local hospital and ask to speak with the nursing manager to arrange this. According to the Case Management Society of America, RN case managers earn $55,000 to $65,000 per year. Always counter your first employment offer to increase your compensation package.

About the Author

Nicki Howell started her professional writing career in 2002, specializing in areas such as health, fitness and personal finance. She has been published at health care websites, such as HealthTree, and is a ghostwriter for a variety of small health care organizations. She earned a Bachelor of Science in business administration from Portland State University.

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