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How to Become an Assistant Pharmacist

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If you enjoy working with people and are good at customer service, consider pursuing a career as a pharmacist assistant. In the pharmacy, the pharmacist is the boss. Next in line is the pharmacy technician and then the pharmacy assistant. The pharmacy assistant is an important member of the pharmacy team because he works with the customers and helps maintain the pharmacy.

Understand what a pharmacist assistant does. A pharmacist assistant answers phones, handles money, inputs data into the computer system and stocks shelves. He or she works with the public, so good customer service is a must. Because a pharmacist assistant deals with the public constantly, appearance is important. You should be neat in appearance and be able to deal with customers in a pleasant and tactful manner.

Submit your resume and application to a pharmacy. Contact your local pharmacies and find out if they are hiring any assistant pharmacists. Keep your resume polished and include any work experience you may have in customer service or data entry. Include your typing speed if you know what it is. Fill out an application, turn in your resume and schedule an interview.

Meet with the employer. When you go in for your job interview, dress for your interview in a way that shows you care about your appearance. Do not go to your interview in jeans and a T-shirt.

Receive on-the-job training. There is no formal training required for the position as a pharmacist assistant. You will be working with and observing a more experienced worker at the pharmacy when you first begin. Once you are familiar with the pharmacy’s equipment, policies and procedures, you will begin working on your own. You will only be trained when new equipment is purchased or when policies and procedures change.

Go to pharmacy assistant or pharmacy technician school. You can attend a school to receive formal training, which will make you more competitive in your line of work. Classes for both pharmacy assistants and pharmacy technicians are offered. Formal training is not a requirement, but it will benefit you in the long run.

Tip

If you want to become a pharmacy technician, you should receive formal training to make you more desirable to your employer.

About the Author

Shannon Steen-Larsen earned a bachelor's degree in marriage, family, and human development, with a minor in business management. She loved to write in school and has been writing for Demand Studios for over a year. She has her own blog and also writes for online networks including SheSpeaks, SheBlogs, Family Review Network, Mom Central, MyBlogSpark, Team Mom, and One2One Network.

Photo Credits

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