How to Become Surgeon General

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How to Become Surgeon General. The Office of the Surgeon General oversees the 6,000 members of the U.S. Public Health Service. Known as America's chief health educator, the Surgeon General informs the people about health issues as new information becomes available. Use these steps to put yourself in a position to be appointed U.S. Surgeon General.

Attend medical school. Aside from becoming a doctor, you should round out your education with a secondary degree in Political Science. Such education and training will help you have an understanding of the political aspects of the job, as well as the medical aspects.

Build a "service to others" resume. Being a doctor is about more than healing people, it is about continual learning and the application of new technology and breakthroughs. Pick an innovative environment for your residency, volunteer in third-world countries, or join a fellowship to help conquer disease and illness around the world. All of these things show a level of compassion that is desired in a Surgeon General.

Promote a platform. Support finding a cure for cancer. Promote tissue and organ donation. Choose some area of health that needs proactive support. Get involved, and then spearhead a movement of your own. Initiative and passion will take you far.

Be an expert. If you are an expert in a certain area or have a passion for a particular field of medicine, explore it to its fullest and bring change in that area. While the Office of the Surgeon General wants a well-rounded individual, it also requires someone who exhibits an expertise and passion in what they do.

Keep working hard and networking among the health and political fields. Build a backing for you and make it known that you would like to serve as Surgeon General.

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