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How to Deal With Injustice at Work

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As a child, your parents may have told you that life isn't always fair, Odds are you have grown to realize that it is true. Sometimes at work, you may end up taking the blame for a problem you didn't create, while the person responsible isn't reprimanded at all. Injustices at work can dishearten even the hardest worker and make it challenging to go to work every day. However, if you take steps to handle injustices, you can find peace at work.

Consider the potential impact of the injustice to help you decide what, if any, action needs to be taken. If the injustice is a minor irritant, such as receiving an email telling you not to do something that you already aren't doing, let it go. However, if the injustice can affect your job, such as a major error that wasn't yours, you need to remedy the situation.

Calm yourself before you make any decisions about your actions. When you approach a situation with a calm demeanor, you are more likely to succeed than when you react in anger or frustration.

Speak directly to the person who has wronged you. In some cases, the co-worker may be unaware of the problem. If he is aware, knowing that it bothers you may be enough to correct the behavior. If not, approach your supervisor about the co-worker.

Collect any facts you need to prove your case to your supervisor. Present your case using facts only. It is easy to allow your emotions to take over, so focus on solid facts that you can prove.

Take the matter to the human resources department if you are unable to make any progress with your supervisor or if your supervisor is part of the problem. However, do this only when the injustice is worth correcting to avoid creating a hostile or uncomfortable work environment for yourself and your co-workers.

Tip

Avoid placing blame on others because this only make you look guilty. Instead, focus on proving you were not at fault.

About the Author

Kimberly Turtenwald began writing professionally in 2000. She has written content for various websites, including Lights 2 You, Online Consultation, Corpus Personal Injury and more. Turtenwald studied editing and publishing at Wisconsin Lutheran College.

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