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Job Description of a Floor Technician

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Floor technicians clean floors and carpets for large facilities such as gymnasiums, hospitals, businesses and schools. Their work improves the overall appearance of an organization, presenting a clean environment to visitors and employees.

Duties

Floor technicians scrub, shine, clean and repair carpeted and noncarpeted areas using appropriate equipment and chemicals. This job includes moving large furniture and objects and following safety guidelines to prevent injury to themselves and others.

Skills

Some equipment may be cumbersome and requires that a floor technician have excellent dexterity and coordination. Knowledge of pH levels and sanitation capabilities of chemicals may also be required.

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Education

Most organizations require a high school diploma or GED and at least one year of experience as a floor technician. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that in most cases, janitors and cleaners learn on the job from a more experienced employee.

Opportunities

Many floor technicians buy their own equipment and supplies to work as contractors for businesses and homes to supplement their income.

Salary

The BLS reports janitors and cleaners earned an average salary of $25,140 in 2013. Salaries might vary by industry or work setting and could be as low as $22,760 for janitors and cleaners in services to buildings and dwellings, but as high as $46,650 for those who worked for the U.S. Postal Service.

2016 Salary Information for Janitors and Building Cleaners

Janitors and building cleaners earned a median annual salary of $24,190 in 2016, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. On the low end, janitors and building cleaners earned a 25th percentile salary of $20,000, meaning 75 percent earned more than this amount. The 75th percentile salary is $31,490, meaning 25 percent earn more. In 2016, 2,384,600 people were employed in the U.S. as janitors and building cleaners.

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