Emergency Management Directors

Annual Earnings Percentiles

Skill Scores

  • social icon 94

    Social

  • supported icon 85

    Supported

  • purpose icon 80

    Purpose

  • analytical icon 76

    Analytical

  • creative icon 70

    Creative

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College Majors

Showing data from the American Community Survey for the following US Census occupation categories:

Bachelor's degree majors are shown.

  • Emergency management directors

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    What Emergency Management Directors Do

    Emergency management directors prepare plans and procedures for responding to natural disasters or other emergencies. They also help lead the response during and after emergencies, often in coordination with public safety officials, elected officials, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies.

    Work Environment

    Most emergency management directors work for state or local governments. However, others may work for private companies, hospitals, or nonprofit organizations.

    How to Become an Emergency Management Director

    Emergency management directors typically need a bachelor’s degree, as well as multiple years of work experience in emergency response, disaster planning, or public administration.

    Job Outlook

    Employment of emergency management directors is projected to grow 6 percent from 2014 to 2024, about as fast as the average for all occupations. A growing number of emergency management directors will be needed to develop response plans to protect people and property, and to limit the damage from emergencies and disasters.

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    Job Trends for Emergency Management Directors

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    This occupation supported 9,900 jobs in 2012 and 10,500 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 6.1%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to increase by 8.1% in 2022 to 10,700 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 10,000, compared with an observed value of 10,500, 5.0% higher than expected. This indicates current employment trends are much better than the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 7.1% in 2024 to 11,200 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 10,800 jobs for 2024, 3.6% lower than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are better than the 2012 trend within this occupation.

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