Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators

Annual Earnings Percentiles

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  • Supported: 71
  • Purpose: 54
  • Analytical: 39
  • Social: 35
  • Creative: 6

What Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators Do

Claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators evaluate insurance claims. They decide whether an insurance company must pay a claim, and if so, how much.

Work Environment

Most claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators work full time. They often work outside the office, inspecting properties for which insurance claims have been made, such as damaged buildings and automobiles.

How to Become a Claims Adjuster, Appraiser, Examiner, or Investigator

A high school diploma or equivalent is typically required for a person to work as an entry-level claims adjuster, examiner, or investigator. Higher positions may require a bachelor’s degree or some insurance-related work experience. Auto damage appraisers typically have either a postsecondary nondegree award or work experience in identifying and estimating the cost of automotive repair.

College Majors

Showing data from the American Community Survey for the following US Census occupation categories:

  • Claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators

Bachelor's degree majors are shown.

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    Job Outlook

    Employment of claims adjusters, appraisers, examiners, and investigators is projected to grow 3 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Demand for these workers is expected to result from growth in the health insurance industry, but should be constrained by automation. In addition, safer automobiles should result in fewer accidents and less demand for auto damage appraisers.

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    Job Trends for Claims Adjusters, Appraisers, Examiners, and Investigators

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    This occupation supported 311,100 jobs in 2012 and 315,200 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 1.3%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to increase by 3.5% in 2022 to 321,900 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 313,200, compared with an observed value of 315,200, 0.6% higher than expected. This indicates current employment trends are about on track with the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 3.1% in 2024 to 324,900 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 324,000 jobs for 2024, 0.3% lower than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are about on track with the 2012 trend within this occupation.