Who Invented the First Spray Bottle?

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

The spray bottle is a vital part of living. It is used for everything from cleaning products, hair products, to insecticides and misters. This article will discuss the history that is known of that every day tool of efficiency, the spray bottle.

Identification

A spray bottle is really quite simple. A nozzle is attached to a tube, that goes down into the liquid. The individual squeezes the trigger and fluid is drawn up through the tube and sprays out. This is accomplished by a two way valve system.

Time Frame

There were spray bottles before the twentieth century, though no one seems to be sure of where they originated from. They were often rubber bulbs used to siphon the liquid. Liquid was drawn up when fast moving air was created by squeezing the bulbs.

History

The first person who seems to have been connected with the modern spray bottle is Dr. Jules Montenier. He developed the first commercial use. It was for "Stoppette". This was an underarm deoderant that was applied by squeezing the bottle. This came onto the public scene in 1947. It was right after World War II and the improvement in plastics coincided with Dr. Montenier's invention. There was no turning back in the plastics industry.

History

Spray bottles took off from that point, but it wasn't until the 1960's that spray bottle with triggers appeared. These quickly became the norm because they were much less tiring to use. Spray bottles became disposable around that time. Prior to that, while plastics were improving, they still could be brittle and breakable. One sprayer was usually used again and again with new glass bottles of window cleaning or whatever liquid was being used.

Potential

Spray bottles today can be used for everything from misting a plant to cleaning a window. They actually make a great discovery lesson for kids (and adults) who are interested in learning about how something as ever present in our world as the spray bottle is really a machine. This simple piece of engineering that uses valves and a pump system to work can teach much about ingenuity and how things work.

About the Author

Ellen Topness has been a counselor in the mental health field for more than 25 years. She has a Master of Arts in counseling. Throughout her career, Topness has enjoyed writing articles, poems and vignettes for pleasure. She also released a new ebook, "A Natural Disaster: Learning to Survive Myself."