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Jobs That Use Electromagnets

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An electromagnet combines the powers of magnetism and electricity to create electrical current. Electromagnets are used in many different professions to create electricity and power devices. When electrical wire is coiled around electromagnets, they become highly magnetized and transfer electricity through the wires to create an electrical charge.

Auto Mechanics

Electromagnets are used in large automobile systems and are responsible for producing electricity and creating motor power. Both electric and hybrid engines use electromagnets to magnetize the electric current and create motion. Auto mechanics are responsible for diagnosing and repairing engines and may have to replace the electromagnets inside. Vehicles with power lock doors also use electromagnets to push open locked doors through an on-board computer. Auto mechanics with an understanding of electromagnets may be able to recognize and diagnose problems in a vehicle more swiftly.

Robotic Engineers

Electromagnets are commonly used in all kinds of robotic devices. The electromagnets create an electric current to power the robotics to make the motor spin and cause the robot to move. Robotics engineers design, test and build the robotic parts, which are able to operate on their own or are controlled by an individual. Robots are used in the aerospace, entertainment, automotive, computer and nuclear industries.

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MRI Technicians

Electromagnets are used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines to create a magnetic field around a patient and look inside a patient’s body. The magnetic forces send radio waves throughout a patient’s body and create pictures of the tissues. MRI technicians are responsible for preparing and executing an MRI procedure. Not only do they explain the procedure to the patient, but they also help move the patient onto the MRI platform. Once the MRI procedure is complete, technicians develop the images and pass them on to physicians.

About the Author

Ted Marten lives in New York City and began writing professionally in 2007, with articles appearing on various websites. Marten has a bachelor's degree in English and has also received a certificate in filmmaking from the Digital Film Academy.

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