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What Jobs Are Available With a Psychology Degree?

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

After college, psychology majors may pursue a variety of career options. The study of psychology deals with human behavior--both scientifically and socially--making graduates well-suited for careers working with other people. Counselors, social workers, advocates, and therapists generally have an educational background in psychology. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics places psychology graduates in the fields of counseling, school psychology, and clinical psychology, with an average salary of around $55,000.

School Psychologist

School counselors and psychologists are in high demand. The job market is very good, but many positions require graduate school (typically a master's degree), certification and licensing. School psychologists work with students in elementary through high school to develop supportive and healthy learning environments. School psychologists work with a wide range of students, including developmentally delayed and gifted children.

Social Work and Advocacy

Social workers and advocates serve as go-betweens for an individual and a social-services system. tje school system, the legal system, or similar agencies. Social workers help individuals decide on career and educational paths and manage daily-living challenges and relationships. Social workers provide a multitude of resources to individuals seeking assistance in a variety of circumstances.

Industrial Psychologist

Industrial psychologists work as consultants or permanent employees to improve and streamline the workplace. Some industrial psychologists work directly with employees and managers to establish a healthy, productive environment. Other industrial psychologists may work on marketing and corporate decision-making.

Forensic Psychologist

Forensic psychology i applies psychological principles and research to criminal justice and the legal system. Forensic psychologists usually work alongside other employees of the criminal justice system, such as lawyers, in evaluating cases and events. Most career forensic psychologists ultimately pursue graduate school, which giving them the opportunity to be expert witnesses and testify in court about psychological conditions and circumstances. Forensic psychologists may find themselves working with civil disputes, theft, violent crime--almost any legal matter can potentially involve forensic psychology.

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About the Author

Leah Berkman has been writing professionally since 2001. She has been published in "Battleground: Science and Technology," a textbook about the sociological and philosophical issues of science. She holds a Bachelor of Science in science and technology studies from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and is pursuing a Master of Arts in Russian and eastern European studies and a Master of Library Science from Indiana University.

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