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How to Become an Insurance Adjuster in Ohio

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If you've ever wanted to help people through emotional and financial hardships while earning a living at the same time, adjusting insurance claims might be the right career for you. In Ohio, you can work as an adjuster directly for an insurance company, or you can be an independent adjuster and work for the clients themselves. To be an independent adjuster, you must first obtain a license from the state. You can then start you own adjuster business or work for an existing firm.

Study for the state exam. Ohio does not require any prelicensing education for public adjusters, so it is your responsibility to adequately prepare. Education providers like Insurance-Schools offer courses designed to prepare you for the exam.

Schedule an exam by visiting the Pearson VUE website. Choose a testing location, date and time. Pay the exam fee at this time. As of November 2010, the fee is $53.

Arrive at the testing center at least 30 minutes prior to the start of the exam. Bring two forms of signature-bearing photo identification.

Take and pass the exam. If you do not pass, schedule another exam date and pay another exam fee.

Complete the background check screening available at the testing center once you pass the exam. Testing staff will take your fingerprints electronically. The cost of the background check is $35 as of November 2010.

Print and complete the public adjuster application form located on the Ohio Department of Insurance website.

Obtain a bond in the amount of $1,000 from a licensed bond agency. The bond form is included with the public adjuster application form.

Submit the completed application, completed bond form and all fees to the Ohio Department of Insurance at the address listed on the application. As of November 2010 the fees are $100 for the application and $10 for the line of business.

Advertise your services or contact existing public adjuster firms for employment once your license is approved.

Tip

It may be easier to join an existing adjuster firm than to start your own. Additionally, the firm may help with the application process and reduce your chances for error.

Warning

Follow all instructions carefully. Submitting an incomplete application may delay your license or cause it to be denied.

About the Author

Stephen Hicks has been writing professionally since 2000. He recently published his first novel, "The Seventh Day of Christmas." He spent three years as a licensed life and property/casualty insurance agent in California. Hicks holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in cinema studies from New York University.

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