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Can I Have a Misdemeanor & Work for the Post Office?

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A misdemeanor conviction does not disqualify you for a job at the post office, but it is one of the factors the United States Postal Service considers when assessing a candidate for hire. The USPS recognizes that people who have committed crimes can become productive, reliable employees. Your goal should be to convince the interviewer that you have learned from your mistakes.

What to Report

If you were convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony – even if you didn’t serve time or pay a fine – you must report it on your application. However, if you were acquitted or if the charges were dropped, you do not need to report the incident because it was not a conviction. If you were convicted as a juvenile, or if your conviction as an adult was expunged, annulled or sealed, you likewise are not required to report it. You also don't need to report a non-criminal conviction, such as a civil suit, or a violation of a local ordinance classified as a non-criminal infraction.

Background Check

An important reason to be honest about your conviction is that the USPS hiring process includes a background check, which includes a criminal record check for all applicants. It may also include a motor vehicle record check if the position for which you apply requires you to drive. The USPS will notify you in advance of the background check via email and request additional information that may include your date of birth, Social Security number and driver’s license number. You also will receive a consent form that you must print, sign and return to the USPS via fax.

About the Author

A retired federal senior executive currently working as a management consultant and communications expert, Mary Bauer has written and edited for senior U.S. government audiences, including the White House, since 1984. She holds a Master of Arts in French from George Mason University and a Bachelor of Arts in English, French and international relations from Aquinas College.

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