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What Is the Salary of a Travel Agent?

Growth Trends for Related Jobs

An entry-level position as a travel agent typically requires only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training. The benefits of the job often include opportunities to try out restaurants, resorts and hotels, or take familiarization tours and cruises at greatly reduced rates. As for pay, the average travel agent earned less than $18 per hour in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Average Salary and Overall Range

The average full-time yearly pay of travel agents was $37,200 in 2013, or $17.88 per hour, according to the BLS. Ten percent of travel agents earned $19,640 per year or less, and 10 percent earned $57,910 or more. Most travel agents have full-time jobs, and many put in extra hours during peak seasons or when customers make last-minute travel arrangements.

An entry-level position as a travel agent typically requires only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training. The benefits of the job often include opportunities to try out restaurants, resorts and hotels, or take familiarization tours and cruises at greatly reduced rates. As for pay, the average travel agent earned less than $18 per hour in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Travel Agent Industries

A majority of travel agents work for travel offices -- 60,330 out of 64,250 agents nationwide, according to the BLS -- averaging an annual wage of $37,090. The second-place industry for jobs was company management, where 630 corporate travel agents averaged $41,740 per year. In third place for jobs, traveler accommodations, had 600 agents averaging $32,270 annually. The highest-paying sector for this profession was land sightseeing, averaging $56,830 per year. The runner-up for pay was sea, coastal and Great Lakes transportation, where annual salaries averaged $55,870.

An entry-level position as a travel agent typically requires only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training. The benefits of the job often include opportunities to try out restaurants, resorts and hotels, or take familiarization tours and cruises at greatly reduced rates. As for pay, the average travel agent earned less than $18 per hour in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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Travel Agent Pay by State

California had 8,350 jobs for travel agents in 2013, the most of any state, and reported average annual salaries of $40,370, according to the BLS. Florida, which was second for jobs, had 6,720 agents earning an average of $34,100 per year. Travel agents in Virginia reported an average pay of $45,480 in 2013, the highest among the states. In second place for pay, agents in Massachusetts earned a yearly average of $43,520, while those in Maryland received third-place salaries averaging $41,950.

An entry-level position as a travel agent typically requires only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training. The benefits of the job often include opportunities to try out restaurants, resorts and hotels, or take familiarization tours and cruises at greatly reduced rates. As for pay, the average travel agent earned less than $18 per hour in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

City Salaries

The greater New York City area had the most jobs for travel agents in 2013, notes the BLS -- 4,330 at an average pay of $40,920 per year. The Chicago area came second for jobs, reporting 3,750 positions at an average pay of $37,500 per year. Framingham, Massachusetts reported an average annual wage $56,060, the highest pay for travel agents of any metro region. The Trenton and Ewing combined region of New Jersey came in second with an average annual wage of $55,370.

An entry-level position as a travel agent typically requires only a high school diploma plus on-the-job training. The benefits of the job often include opportunities to try out restaurants, resorts and hotels, or take familiarization tours and cruises at greatly reduced rates. As for pay, the average travel agent earned less than $18 per hour in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Job Prospects

The ease of booking airfare, hotels, tours and cruises online without a travel agent has reduced the number of jobs in the industry. The BLS expects this trend to continue, predicting a 12 percent decline in jobs between 2012 and 2022. Travel agents who specialize in niche markets -- such as student groups, women's tours, senior citizen travel and outdoor adventures -- will have the best job prospects, notes the BLS.

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