The Average Pizza Parlor Income

By Rick Suttle
Dick Luria/Photodisc/Getty Images

Income and Qualifications

The average pizza parlor owner made $59,000 per year as of 2013, according to the job website Indeed. If you have the capital to purchase or finance a pizza franchise, the company will usually train you. If you start from scratch, it behooves you to have at least a couple of years experience managing a pizza restaurant. Other essential qualifications include leadership, communication and customer service skills.

Income by Region

Average incomes for pizza parlor owners varied somewhat within the four U.S. regions in 2013. In the Midwest region, owner's incomes ranged from $46,000 to $62,000. Those in the West ranged from $42,000 to $65,000 per year. If you owned a pizza parlor in the Northeast region, you would earn $52,000 to $70,000. In the South, pizza parlor owners earned between $50,000 or $69,000. The incomes depended on which state and which area within the state the pizza parlor operated.

Contributing Factors

Most pizza parlor owners earn higher incomes through experience, mainly because they build repeat business over time. With experience, you should also know which advertising media draws the most customer traffic to your restaurant, e.g., direct mail or online advertisements. Moreover, you will likely earn more in areas with higher populations, especially in business districts or near major highways. Brand recognition can also earn you higher profits in the pizza industry, especially if you own a franchise. Franchise companies usually advertise for their franchisees, which can enhance your profit margin.

Job Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn't report job trend data for pizza parlor owners. It does project job opportunities for food service managers, which are expected to decline 3 percent in the next decade -- far below the 14 percent growth-rate of most occupations. Pizza is a highly competitive industry, with several large pizza chains. You may be more successful in a smaller market with fewer competitors. Another option is selling niche pizzas, such as Sicilian or Chicago-style, to differentiate your offerings from competitors.

About the Author

This article was written by the CareerTrend team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about CareerTrend, contact us.