Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians

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Annual Earnings Percentiles

Skill Scores

  • supported icon 83

    Supported

  • analytical icon 63

    Analytical

  • creative icon 55

    Creative

  • purpose icon 35

    Purpose

  • social icon 31

    Social

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College Majors

  • Engineering technicians, except drafters

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    What Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians Do

    Aerospace engineering and operations technicians operate and maintain equipment used in developing, testing, and producing new aircraft and spacecraft. Increasingly, these workers are using computer-based modeling and simulation tools and processes in their work.

    Work Environment

    Aerospace engineering and operations technicians usually work in manufacturing or industrial plants, laboratories, and offices. Some of these workers may be exposed to hazards from equipment or from toxic materials, but incidents are rare as long as proper procedures are followed.

    How to Become an Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technician

    Many employers prefer to hire aerospace engineering and operations technicians who have earned an associate’s degree in engineering technology. Prospective technicians also may earn certificates or diplomas offered by vocational or technical schools. Some aerospace engineering and operations technicians must have security clearances to work on projects related to national defense.

    Job Outlook

    Employment of aerospace engineering and operations technicians is projected to grow 4 percent from 2014 to 2024, slower than the average for all occupations. Workers in this occupation work on many projects that are related to national defense and therefore require security clearances. These requirements will help to keep jobs in the United States.

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    Job Trends for Aerospace Engineering and Operations Technicians

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    This occupation supported 9,900 jobs in 2012 and 11,400 jobs in 2014, reflecting an increase of 15.2%. In 2012, this occupation was projected to decrease by 0.0% in 2022 to 9,900 jobs. As of 2014, to keep pace with prediction, the expected number of jobs was 9,900, compared with an observed value of 11,400, 15.2% higher than expected. This indicates current employment trends are much better than the 2012 trend within this occupation. In 2014, this occupation was projected to increase by 4.0% in 2024 to 11,800 jobs. Linear extrapolation of the 2012 projection for 2022 results in an expected number of 9,900 jobs for 2024, 16.1% lower than the 2014 projection for 2024. This indicates expectations for future employment trends are much better than the 2012 trend within this occupation.

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